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Archive for the ‘Motivation’ Category

Archie

I have to admit I was skeptical at first. What can a pile of trash bricks, mud and sand do, on a barren poisoned wasteland? Or some pouches of dirt around this and other abandoned post-industrial zones in the city? Apparently, a month later, the most awesome party ever, where everybody makes their own pizza and bakes it in the centerpiece of the whole happening, Archie the dome oven. Pumpkin, Zucchini, Beetroot, Onion farmed by the city farmers. Even the honeybees had participated. A huge thanks to everyone!

People building archie the clay oven in Helsinki

Building Archie

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Noticed by Things Break. I’ve only seen Solaris. It had a lot of good in it, although it was quite uneven and somewhat overlong. Certain acting is very intensive and memorable. Having read the book twice, I even experienced it completely differently both times. The American version from 2002 with George Clooney I haven’t seen completely, but from the first quarter, it seems to have some large stylistic jumps from the book which I find odd – the props in the seventies Soviet version actually seemed much more fitting to me! Probably everybody just reads the book differently.

One of the great themes of Stanislaw Lem seems to be dysfunctional organizations. This should ring a bell with my readers… 😉 Though Solaris is very different from all of his other stories. But I don’t want to spoil too much.

I have also read the Strugatski brothers’ Stalker, which was also cinematized by Tarkovski. It was a peculiar book and felt somehow like a weird mishmash with too much familiar and unreal blended to work as a whole. With some changes it might actually work well with modern special effects – or I hear that the computer game of the same name actually is great, though maybe not very plot intensive. Stalker was actually filmed in Tallinn, Estonia I hear and you can see the place somewhere there (if they haven’t torn it down, they’re rebuilding at a pace there).

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If you speak german, this video is nice. They show it driving, in construction and design.

Though it is complex, heavy at 450 kg and expensive at 62,000 euros. Uses a BMW motorcycle engine and sits two people in tandem and looks like an airplane cockpit. It could serve as an interesting datapoint if more fuel efficient non-mass transport vehicles are to be developed for single commuters. The E-tracer version has had success in the automotive X-Prize. It’s no small deal, since that includes handling tests.

Overview of the Monotracer in english:

Lane change handling test at automotive X-Prize:

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It doesn’t have the same sound as “The Last V-8” now does it? When you look at what’s happening in the world of automobiles, you get some idea of a change. It is always slow, yet I predict that when it happens, probably starting before the end of this year, people are taken by surprise.

Why Would Anyone Buy A Hybrid Car?

It doesn’t have that much better fuel economy than a modern petrol or diesel engine if you drive out of the city, and it costs some more and is complicated. New turbocharged and variable valve engines can do pretty well because they can be built to opearate in a flexible manner. BMW has even introduced a technique that could be called a “virtual hybrid” – where the aircon compressor and battery charger are disconnected when the gas pedal is pushed to the bottom, resulting in extra power available for traction – allowing a smaller engine to achieve the same acceleration.

In some cases, like buses that need to stop often, hybrids make great sense, but otherwise I see the improvements in ordinary direct internal combustion engine driven cars narrowing the gap quite considerably. On the highway the hybrid has no advantage.

A Seemingly Small Addition

Volvo V70 Plugin Hybrid Prototype

So, add a grid recharge capability and you have a plugin hybrid. By itself that’s not much yet though, you have to enlarge the batteries too. Since most trips for most people are commuting and errands, they’re short and can be done entirely on battery power. You also still haul the gasoline engine along and it is used on longer trips. Most problems solved right here? Sounds easy.

Chevy Volt / Opel Ampera is coming soon. And just take a look at the huge number of plugin hybrids being developed, listed at Plugin America. Most of these will be dead ends, but some might make it big.

Pure Electric Cars – The Charging Problem

The problem is, gasoline is very very energy intensive. If a car uses 8 L for 100 km and a 10 kWh worth of energy, then tankage of 40 liters gives about 50 kWh of energy. Done in 50 seconds this stream of gasoline through the hose is worth 1 kWh per second or 3.6 megawatts. High enough temperature superconductors have not yet been invented that would make a hand-attachable 3.6 megawatt car charger possible. If we generously assume 240 Volts and 40 Amperes, the charging power is only 10 kilowatts. The largest home appliances like sauna stoves and water heaters are in the single kilowatts range. They often use 380 V three phase power here, but that gets slightly impractical for a car charger. This thousandfold disparity in energy replenishment speed is striking. An optimistic 10 kW charger would charge a 100 km drive’s worth of energy in an hour. Certainly useful for commuters. Charging as range extension seems doubtful. Our summer cottage is 300 km from Helsinki. If a full battery only lasts the first 200 km, one would have to stop at a loading station for one hour before one could drive the rest of the way. Not realistic. The penalty of lugging around the heavy and complicated IC engine has to be bitten at this point of battery development.

Battery Improvements?

There exist some pretty high energy per mass battery technologies right now, but they are expensive and use rare materials like cobalt that they can never really be mainstream solutions on something that stores energy in the megawatt hour class. Hopefully with enough money now available, some cheaper and less material intensive ways to store electrical energy can be developed.

Your Local Correspondent

Naturally, Finland would be a pretty ideal place to have electric and plugin hybrid vehicles. A significant portion of the populace keeps their cars parked in a spot with an electric socket nearby – those house timers that turn on the cylinder block heater on an hour or so before leaving for work in the wintertime, meaning less fuel use and wear for the engine. It is trivial to use those 240 V outlets for electric car charging. Also, electric cars are actually manufactured in the city of Uusikaupunki, Finland by Valmet. The Th!nk City is one. Too bad because of insane tax policies, it is not actually sold here – at the moment you can only get them in Norway, Austria and Holland. The Fisker Karma electric sports car will also be manufactured in “Uki”. I think they have a long nose on the car for Freudian reasons – since it doesn’t need to hold a long block internal combustion engine – or maybe it’s just that buyers are conservative. And then there’s the e-cars now project aiming to refit old Toyota Corollas with electric motors and batteries. But there’s more.

Automotive X-Prize

There’s that going on, which is actually interesting! My favorite vehicle is the Peraves E-Tracer.

Here are the results from August 2 but I still don’t know what will change / what is coming because the pages are unclear: [EDIT: fresh info at the blog indicates some testing is still going on]

1st Place Team Lithium Ion Motors of North Carolina (125 MPGe average fuel economy for the event)
2nd Place RaceAbout Association of Finland (0.179 seconds behind the leader and 100 MPGe average fuel economy for the event)
3rd Place TW4XP of Germany (11 minutes, 36.9 seconds behind the leader and 139 MPGe average fuel economy for the event)
4th Place ZAP of California (DNF – 48 laps completed)
5th Place Aptera of California (DNF – 18 laps completed)

The Raceabout team is from Helsinki’s Metropolia university of applied sciences. They have a long background of building electric vehicles, and it’s nice to see something in the competition that looks like an actual car, yet still manages to do so well.

RaceAbout's E-RA vehicle in the Automotive X-Prize 2010 competition

Hopefully the politicians here can get something sensible done, and the super-high taxes on electric vehicles (basically, anything that isn’t gasoline or diesel is considered fishy and is taxed hugely) can be dropped so we can start seeing more of them here! The current situation is a travesty!

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Curvirostra, I think, in the blog header picture. (Shot through a scope. My parents’ camera’s light baffle fits over the eyepiece almost perfectly.) It’s probably not Pytyopsittacus or Leucoptera. The latter dines in larch but these didn’t have the clear white stripes in the wings and it’s more rare anyway.

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Regarding light gathering area and sensor noise are harsh. Well, it was cheap and it’s tiny and has a rechargeable battery. Maybe it’ll do something worthwhile. The view is from the kitchen window after 11 pm. Why do these things have 10 megapixels? I took the pic in 3 MP mode,  scaled it down in Gimp to about one and it’s still too big, most of the information is just noise. Better use that smallest picture mode so I can use that SD card for a loong time… I also edited the curves slightly to bring more forest and less white in the sky. OK, maybe I’m being a bit rough on it, that’s a huge contrast between the sky and the trees.

Nine Megapixels Noise, One Signal

Nikon Coolpix S203 it is by the way, though these are all probably made in the same factory… 😉

If someone brought to market a 3 mpix camera with twice the quantum well depth, that’d be interesting.

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I didn’t have a camera with me but I was surprised at their impressiveness. From afar, they looked like old gas storage vessels (like in Suvilahti, Helsinki), but they really were dome-shaped seaplane hangars. Luckily Flickr has at least some photo as well as Panoramio here. The museum has home pages here.

I picked the wrong day to go there as it seems all of Tallinn’s museums are closed on mondays and tuesdays (The Kumu art museum was one potential destination too), but I couldn’t really choose the day anyway at that point. I could still tour the stuff that was outside. There was a lot of construction and renovation work going on. The domes were full of scaffolding for builders. Actually that would have provided for a really good photo opportunity since it divided the volume into cubes as a great visualization of the size of the thing, together with people for scale. The top was being sandblasted and you could see the rebar from many places. This is not a cheap project and will be ready by 2011.

They are not super-huge though. No Saro Princess could fit in them. They were built in 1916 and 1917 after all! I could also see the old first independence battle’s ice breaker Suur Tõll and the Lembit submarine, as well as an array of patrol boats donated by various countries to the young Estonian defence force in the nineties.

I will write other things inspired by the trip in other posts, there was certainly a large amount of thoughts that arose and observations that were made.

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